Mikhail Blagosklonny: Cancer and Aging Scientist and Researcher

Mikhail Blagosklonny is a scientist who currently researches aging and cancer. He earned both his M.D. and his PhD. in cardiology and experimental medicine from the First Pavlov State Medical University of St. Petersburg, Russia. In 2002, he was appointed associate professor of medicine at at New York Medical College, Valhalla, NY. He was later appointed senior scientist at Ordway Research Institute in Albany, New York until 2009. He is now one of the leading professors in the study of oncology at the Roswell Park Cancer Institute in Buffalo, New York. This institute was the first medical facility for the treatment of cancer and its research in the United States.

Mikhail Blagosklonny’s research includes cancer therapy and targeted cancer therapies protecting the cells in the human body from damage. He also studies the biological causes of aging and the effects of anti-aging drugs on this process. Based on his extensive research in the area of anti-cancer therapy, he suggested and recommended using a popular cancer drug known as rapamycin, as a an effective treatment to stop the proliferation of tumor cells and extending the life of humans. The Helmholtz Association of German Research Centres on Research Gate recently published a study of rapamycin and its known affects on the increase of the lifespan in mice. This effect may be the result of the suppression of tumors and their growth. Tumors represent the main causes of death in mice.

Rapamycin is a therapeutic drug on tandfonline.com with immunosuppressant and anti-tumor properties. Rapamycin affects tumor cells through the regulation of mTOR protein kinase. mTOR controls cell growth, reproductions of the cell, movement of the cell, protein synthesis, transcription, and the survival of the cell. Rapamycin inhibits or blocks this protein kinase from allowing the cancer cells to proliferate, inducing tumor cell apoptosis or cell death and suppressing angiogenesis or the creation of veins within tumors.